Library Loot and the end of Cannes

library-lootIt’s time for Library Loot again. It’s been a while since I was on vacation the last week. While I was there (in Portland, Oregon), I found the most amazing art house theater. I know other cities have stuff like this, but a theater with a full service bar, full service Mexican restaurant, and couches to sit on instead of theater chairs is an unheard of luxury where I actually live. I may move there just for the theaters. As for the last library loot, Elephant Man was the clear favorite.  It also completed Lynch’s oeuvre for me (besides Dune which I’ve been well advised to skip).  As for Persona, I’m not ashamed to say I just didn’t get it.  While I didn’t enjoy  the film much, I did appreciate Bergman’s insanely unique style (near-subliminal flashes of erections and all).  I didn’t make it to Shame before the due date, so I’ll have to catch that one later.  Here’s this week’s loot:

dirty-harryone-flew-over-the-cuckoos-nest

Right now, I’m completely bored with my choices at theaters. In fact, I haven’t seen anything since Tokyo! a few weeks ago.  This has driven my focus to DVDs which are providing much more challenging subject matter than Dance Flick or Angels & Demons.  It also leaves me longing following the Cannes Film Festival.  It’s over, and they’ve announced their winners.  Here they are, if you haven’t already found out.

Palme d’Or
DAS WEISSE BAND (The White Ribbon) directed by Michael HANEKE

I couldn’t be happier for Haneke.  He’s kind of a freak, but in my opinion, he’s one of the most talented directors today working with onscreen violence.  If you’ve got a strong stomach, and want to experience a completely inimitable film, check out Haneke’s Funny Games, both the 1997 version, and the 2007 one.  One of my most disappointing Sundance experiences ever was when Haneke didn’t show up for a Q&A.
Grand Prix
UN PROPHÈTE (A Prophet) directed by Jacques AUDIARD

Audiard is brilliant!  His last film The Beat My Heart Skipped is one of my all time favorites.  Click here to read my review.

Lifetime achievement award for his work and his exceptional contribution to the history of cinema
Alain RESNAIS

Best Director
Brillante MENDOZA for KINATAY

This seems a strange choice for Cannes.  Several critics, including the massively delusional Ebert have suggested that it’s the ‘new worst film ever shown at Cannes.’  This is definitely a must see now there’s so much controversy.

Jury Prize
FISH TANK directed by Andrea ARNOLD

BAK-JWI (Thirst) directed by PARK Chan-Wook

Best Performance for an Actor
Christoph WALTZ in INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS directed by Quentin TARANTINO

It’s a long cry from the Palm D’Or that Tarantino won for Pulp Fiction, but it’s nice to see a little attention go to this, no doubt, bitchin’ film.

Best Performance by an Actress
Charlotte GAINSBOURG in ANTICHRIST directed by Lars von TRIER

This is the second most anticipated Cannes film for me.  The trailer blows my mind, the press around it couldn’t be more curious, and I’ve always had a hard on for von Trier.

Best Screenplay
MEI Feng for CHUN FENG CHEN ZUI DE YE WAN (Spring Fever) directed by LOU Ye

Prix Vulcain: Artist-Technician

Aitor BERENGUER, sound technician of the movie MAP OF THE SOUNDS OF TOKYO directed by Isabel COIXET.

IN COMPETITION – SHORT FILMS

Palme d’Or

ARENA directed by João SALAVIZA

Special
Distinction

THE SIX DOLLAR FIFTY MAN directed by Mark ALBISTON, Louis SUTHERLAND

CAMERA D’OR
SAMSON AND DELILAH directed by Warwick THORNTON (presented at Un Certain Regard)

Caméra d’Or – Special Distinction
AJAMI directed by Scandar COPTI, Yaron SHANI (presented at Quinzaine des Réalisateurs)


UN CERTAIN REGARD


Prix Un Certain Regard – Fondation Groupama Gan pour le Cinéma

KYNODONTAS (Dogtooth) by Yorgos LANTHIMOS

Jury Prize

POLITIST, ADJECTIV (Police, Adjective) by Corneliu PORUMBOIU.

Special Prize Un Certain Regard 2009

KASI AZ GORBEHAYE IRANI KHABAR NADAREH (No One Knows About Persian Cats) by Bahman GHOBADI

LE PÈRE DE MES ENFANTS (Father of My Children) by Mia HANSEN-LØVE

CINEFONDATION

First Cinéfondation Prize

BÁBA by Zuzana Kirchnerová-Špidlová (FAMU, République Tchèque)

Second Cinéfondation Prize

GOODBYE by Song Fang (Beijing Film Academy, Chine)

Third Cinéfondation Prize (ex aequo)

DIPLOMA by Yaelle Kayam (The Sam Spiegel Film & TV School, Israël)

NAMMAE UI JIP (Don’t Step out of the House) directed by Jo Sung-hee (Korean Academy of Film Arts, Corée du Sud)

Comments
3 Responses to “Library Loot and the end of Cannes”
  1. Mitch says:

    Was “Persona” your first Bergman? There’s no shame in not “getting it”; it’s an enigma of a film that has generated volumes of analysis, debate, and conjecture. Seriously: http://books.google.com/books?id=CR8JsHbnkS0C&pg=PA42&dq=bergman%27s+persona+cambridge#PPP16,M1

    If you haven’t seen other Bergmans, don’t let the difficulty of this one leave you cold. “Persona” is, by far, Bergman’s most experimental and least narratively-structured film.

  2. Blake says:

    Wow. That’s a lot of essays. The only other Bergman film I’ve seen is The Virgin Spring, which was much more accessible.

  3. Mitch says:

    Check out “The Seventh Seal,” “Wild Strawberries,” “Winter Light,” “The Silence,” “Cries and Whispers,” and “Fanny and Alexander” (specifically, the TV version). In addition to “Persona,” those are the masterpieces.

    I also have a special adoration for “Through a Glass Darkly” and “Scenes from a Marriage.” You may want to watch “Through a Glass Darkly” with “Winter Light” and “The Silence” anyway, as they constitute an informal trilogy on themes of religious faith. “Scenes” is great stuff, but at five hours for the TV version, you will want to be fully invested before tackling that one.

    Additionally, you make like “Hour of the Wolf,” the closest Bergman came to doing a horror film. Lars von Trier has mined more than a few gems out of that film.

Leave A Comment

CommentLuv badge